Tuesday, August 30, 2016

Exhausted Moon

Solitude ~ Sir Fredrick Lord Leighton ~ 1890


An exhausted moon,
haunted by clouds
and August’s thermometer,
shines her shallow light
across my bedroom floor.

Joined in our communion
of melancholy we search
for erasers linked to lead
sharp enough to rewrite destiny.

Empathy’s drain has robbed
stars from our lanterns.
There is only so much darkness
a candle can illuminate
until sorrow burns away the wick.

Feeling another’s pain through
the thin bones of our own,
the moon and I peer toward the east
wondering how many new tears
sunlight will bring to our bell jar.

©Susie Clevenger 2016

9 comments:

Sherry Blue Sky said...

This is powerful, Susie. I especially like "there is only so much darkness a cable can illuminate until sorrow burns away the wick."

Jim said...

Feeling another's pain is indeed a painful experience, there isn't much we can do except to be there. I liked the idea of the candle as a poor light source, just a notch better than the moonlight that came in.
I had a memory loss about what a Bell Jar was but caught up again with a quick short Google break. We have three with expired family members' watches inside. While on break I ran into Sylvia Plath notes that this was the title of her only novel, Bell Jar. I had forgotten that also. I guess forgetfulness is beater than constant pain.
..

brudberg said...

Oh I do love this relationship we develop at night.. I will always think how many else seek her light and if we can touch each other hands through its light.

Rosemary Nissen-Wade said...

Beautiful, and beautifully sad. The bell jar reference is somewhat chilling.

georgeplaceblog said...

Lovely poem. Thank goodness for those people who are willing to share our pain though it costs so much.

Outlawyer said...

Oh dear-- a very sad sad poem, and very evocative of all those difficulties that we cannot change. Thanks. And take care, Susie. k.

Kerry O'Connor said...

Phew! this is so resonant, Susie. The empathy of the poet's view is palpable, yet the painterly phrasing reminds the reader of the skill behind the images.

Martin Kloess said...

Elegance in sadness. Thank you

elsa said...

This is incredible.