Thursday, April 9, 2015

Three Days of Breath

Fate ~ Alphonse Mucha 

Star eyes see tomorrow
through threads spun
into length of days.

A question rocks
three days of breath
before what will be is sealed.

Fed from the moon’s breast
infant dreams spill from cradle
into first dust of dawn.

With thread and knife fate
arrives to cut life into hours
that can never be changed.

©Susie Clevenger 2015


Process Notes:
The Moirai or Fates were three sister deities, incarnations of destiny and life. Their names were Clotho, the one who spins the thread of life; Lachesis, she who draws the lots and determines how long one lives, by measuring the thread of life; and Atropos, the inevitable, she who chose how someone dies by cutting the thread of life with her shears. They were often described as being ugly and old women, stern and severe. Three days after a child was born, it was thought that the Moirai would visit the house to determine the child's fate and life.

NaPoWriMo ~ Day 9

13 comments:

Rosemary Nissen-Wade said...

A lovely blend of delicacy in expression and the inevitability in the message.

Sherry Blue Sky said...

What wonderful imagery - just beautiful writing, Susie. Love the interesting process notes too.

Ella said...

I love these lines:
"Fed from the moon’s breast
infant dreams spill from cradle
into first dust of dawn"

So, well done! I, too found your note fascinating~ Thank you!

Your really brought the art to life!

Sanaa Rizvi said...

This is such a wise poem! Beautifully written... rich in tone and expression.. specially adored these lines here:

A question rocks
three days of breath
before what will be is sealed.

So utterly profound!!
Love,
Sanaa

grapeling said...

Susie, you redeem the old storytelling with this pen ~

ccchampagne said...

I recognise the myth behind this as one from Norse Mythology, but didn't know much more than that and never would have thought to combine the beautiful painting with this particular view on life and fate. You really sparked my interest and got my creative juices flowing with this piece! Wonderful!

Kerry O'Connor said...

I've always thought the Fates had the worst job in the world, but kind of cool too.
Your words are chosen with care, and each stanza is perfectly balanced. The poem takes the picture to a new level.

Gillena Cox said...

luv the mythology behind the poem, fits the stern gaze in the painting you choose; thanks for sharing

i'm happy you dropped in to read mine

much love...

Debi Swim said...

"Fed from the moon’s breast infant dreams spill from cradle into first dust of dawn." Beautiful, Susie

hedgewitch said...

This poem gets to the real sense behind the mythic figures--that our lives are, in the last analysis, only so much ours, so much under our own control.That we all share the commonality of our human fate. A great Mucha to work with, Susie, and you have done it justice.

Helen said...

The concept of cutting life into hours ~~ puts an interesting spin on things. Smiles.

Hannah said...

I love your third stanza...the entirety feels expansive enveloping.

Other Mary said...

Very cool. I would never have paired the Fates with this picture, but now I can't imagine it any other way.