Sunday, August 10, 2014

Kingfisher

                  


I am beak and bone
in a wingless world
staring into an eternity
dotted with camera winks.

No more do I live halcyon days
blessed with blue sky, clutch and sea.

Trapped in glass,
void of my brilliant plumage,
I sit glued to my perch
like a stone angel
carved to adorn my
kingfisher headstone.


©Susie Clevenger 2014

Halcyon: Etymology

From Latin Alcyone, daughter of Aeolus and wife of Ceyx. When her husband died in a shipwreck, Alcyone threw herself into the sea whereupon the gods transformed them both into halcyon birds (kingfishers). When Alcyone made her nest on the beach, waves threatened to destroy it. Aeolus restrained his winds and made the waves be calm during seven days in each year, so she could lay her eggs. These became known as the "halcyon days", when storms never occur.

Image: Free Wide Wallpapers

At Real Toads Margaret Bednar provided her skeleton photography as inspiration for our poetry.  Artistic Interpretations ~ Skeleton Poetry

8 comments:

Björn Rudberg said...

So moving -- the kingfisher with nothing left... the ordeals catching fish most likely seems like bliss now.. a very good text to the picture.

DeniseinVA said...

I loved the story of Halcyon. Thanks for sharing that. Also for your photo and poetry. In the Smithsonian they have a whole glass case of such birds. Hard to imagine that once they were freely flying around. Your poems is very thought provoking.

Mama Zen said...

This is really cool, Susie!

Sherry Blue Sky said...

"I am beak and bone in a wingless world" - just brilliant! Beautiful writing and I so feel for the grounded bird. I relate!

juzta mom said...

Such a painful expression of life that was. Beautiful!

Magaly Guerrero said...

That first stanza is a heartbreaking beauty, Susie. I was all cooing and sighs, then you spiced it all up with one of my favorite myths and I fell in love.

This is a forever treasure!

Susan said...

What a life! Not exactly the peace the ancients wrought. Your poem makes me think of amber--the golden lumps that freeze an exoskeleton forever. I'll never look at skeletons under glass the same way again. "Camera winks" is brilliant.

Margaret said...

Thanks for the notes on Halcyon. I have always admired the Kingfisher birds and I appreciate the story - I like the idea of nature holding off for seven days for these grand birds. I found the bones to be so fascinating - Thanks for writing to my photos and sorry it took me so long to make the rounds.